Episode 6 – Carthage Strikes Back

1024px-Carthage-1958-PortsPuniques
Remains of the military harbor of Carthage.  In Antiquity, the central island would be home to the admiral’s headquarters while the rectangular merchant harbor would occupy the area to the right in the photo.  The entire complex would be surrounded by thick walls.  For an artistic rendition of what the harbor may have looked like, click here.
Map_of_ancient_Syracuse_-_Wilkins_William_-_1807
Map of ancient Syracuse.  Notice the Ortygia island which later Syracusan tyrants would make their stronghold.
Carthage_EL_shekel from 300 BC
Carthaginian shekel displaying the wreathed head of Tanit and a warhorse.  Besides the warhorse, the palm tree was another symbol of ancient Carthage which often appeared on coins.  Original photo by Classical Numismatic Group, Inc.
Magna_Graecia_ancient_colonies_and_dialects
Map of Magna Graecia, or “Great Greece,” showing both the Greek colonies and Greek dialects associated with them.

During the seventy year peace with Syracuse, Carthage regrouped by instituting government reforms and overhauling its tremendous infrastructure. Meanwhile, Syracusan factions squabbled internally, fluctuating between democratic and autocratic governments. Despite this, Syracuse won a stunning victory against Athens in the Sicilian Expedition, only to watch its allies be trounced by the Carthaginians commanded by Hannibal Mago, grandson of Hamilcar, the general who fell at Himera. Yet, with Syracuse reeling from battle, the Carthaginians spared the city and made peace, a decision that they would later rue in the coming years.

Download: Episode 6 – Carthage Strikes Back

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